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Hogan Lovells and Herbies launch scheme to employ mums
03 June 2016
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Hogan Lovells and Herbert Smith Freehills have launched a scheme in the UK and Australia to attract women who took career breaks to have children back to work.

The firms have teamed up with OnRamp, a US organisation, to indentify female lawyers seeking to return to private practice. Intended to tackle the leaky pipeline of law in which females comprise more than half the lawyers entering the profession but less than 24% of partners, the "Fellowships" will provide women with one-year paid positions.

Hogan Lovells helped pilot the OnRamp scheme in the US in 2014, and now both firms are bringing it to the UK, and Herbies is also introducing it in Australia. Successful applicants, who must be at least 3PQE and returning after a break of at least two years, will undertake fee-earning work. But they will also be given an advisor within the firm, an external career counsellor and training from experts in negotiations, oral advocacy, and project management.

  "There's been a misunderstanding. None of you are eligible."

Fellows will not necessarily be permanently employed at HogLove or Herbies (though OnRamp has said that if a relevant position is available, they can interview for it). They may go elsewhere, and the goal of the scheme is instead to produce a "high performer who returns to the workforce with upgraded skills and experience, additional contacts, an excellent reference" and, probably the hardest impulse to revive, "a renewed ambition to service clients".

Hogan Lovells UK Managing Partner Susan Bright said "we know first-hand the perspective and value these returning women add to our population and the profession," while Sue Gilchrist, Herbies Regional Managing Partner of Asia & Australia, said it was "vitally important that we continue to find ways to access the untapped pool of female talent for roles within the firm".

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anonymous user
03/06/2016 12:48
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I think this is fantastic. The real problem however is not with employers it's with school hours. If we could move out on from ancient times where kids went to school 9-3 for 192 days of the year and shift with society we might get somewhere. Kids of working mums don't want to be in after school care or with a nanny on their own, the school day needs to be longer. Anyone fancy opening a school where kids are taught 8:30-5:30, learn other languages, life skills and play a wide range of sports and games? Where you can take your kids out for up to 8 weeks a year but for no more than 3 weeks at a time. We wouldn't have to pay triple every time we want a break.. and it would be a break convenient to all of us.... Kids, employers and mums and dads.
#cant we have an alternative?
anonymous user
03/06/2016 14:05
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That is a lovely idea but when would the teachers get a break? They already work long hours outside of the school day for low salaries.
anonymous user
03/06/2016 14:57
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It isn't usually the returning women who need career counsellors, advisors, training etc. It is others in the workforce who do not take account of the changed circumstances and are only willing to work in a Man's World.
anonymous user
03/06/2016 19:10
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#can we have an alternative

Yes - it's called private
anonymous user
03/06/2016 22:23
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Enjoyed the fiest comment which is a fine example of, the world must revolve around me, thinking. Schools, and education, shouldn't be factories run for the convenience if parents.
anonymous user
17/06/2016 08:41
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God this is depressing. When does anyone ever remember that fathers exist? Why is a father who takes a career break (and is to be honest doing far more to advance the case of equality) deemed to be unworthy of this generosity?

Just some flexibility would really, really help - that and not constantly being pushed to the back of the queue on promotions for not doing 1,800 hours chargeable a year...