Earlier this month Ian Mann, the new Managing Partner of offshore law firm Harneys, gave an interview to Asian Legal Business. "If you can work out what he is saying please let us know", said an underling on behalf of baffled staff, because it’s “absolute bollocks”.

Happy to help!

h1

"We've told everyone they're a leader. It makes no sense but that's the point. The way to dominate someone is to break their sense of reality, mine included."

h2

"I'm doing it to you right now."

3

"The non-lawyers at the top, the so-called Operational C-Suite, have completely taken over. They view solicitors with contempt and believe we should be driven from the cities to work in the fields."

4

"Every day we have to applaud the head of BD while the person who stopped applauding first the day before is hanged."

5

"I just chunter garbage now. Why are you nodding?"


save

Nonsense this nonsensical comes from a place of pain.


6

"Chinese rule has been our inspiration and we kiss that country's ass every day."

7

"We sent branded mousemats to a load of dodgy factories."

8

"One of them read the mousemat, hacked our website and said they wouldn't give it back unless we bought 70,000 knock-off Earpods."
 

ch

"Do you need any Earpods?"

fair

"Taking inspiration from Xi Jinping, Putin and Seamus Milne, our new leaders on the Operational C-Suite brook no dissent and strike without warning or explanation. There is no mercy."

10

"They make me tie dissenters to the re-education chair."

11

"We cannot speak our minds in public. The enemy is always listening."

12

"No-one trusts anyone."

13

"We chant maxims in praise of guff 19 hours a day. It's madness. There's no time to sleep, let alone work. I know I started all this, but it's out of control."

Good luck Ian!

Category

Comments

One of many former employees of this madman 24 September 19 04:13

I can happily confirm that your translation is an eerily accurate interpretation of the inner workings of this [redacted by rof]. In addition to this insane garble Ian frequently refers to the firm as a cult (in a positive way if that is possible) [redacted by rof]. In one memorable email he told his team that at social events they should “show genuine loyalty and fondness for Harneys - we are a cult get over it and embrace it!” 

Former co-worker 24 September 19 12:46

He has turned a once-respectable firm into something very different. 

Look at the number of [redacted by ROF].  Everyone knows the reason.

Look at the staff turnover.  Associates in HK were [redacted by ROF]

There is a 2010 [redacted by ROF].  Quite why Harneys (who presumably know of this) put someone with his record in charge of their Asia practice is a total mystery.

It is probably true that Harneys is seen as exceptional, but not for the reasons they would like to think.  The other offshore firms in Asia treat Harneys (well, the HK office) as a big source of amusement.  That said, they do quite well out of it themselves because there is no denying that Mr Mann has built a following for his "cult", which generates work for everyone.

Somethings never change 24 September 19 14:16

He's always been a bit of a cockalorum pettifogger....

Keep chanting those maxims!

Ex-Harneys employee 24 September 19 18:59

No surprises here and completely consistent with the total nonsense he used to spout on a daily basis. 

Only surprised it has taken this long for this wonderful source of amusement to be discovered. 

Hahaharneys 25 September 19 10:42

This is actually unusually coherent in comparison to   his some of finest delusional drivel.

Offshore lawyer 25 September 19 18:24

What a nonsense story. This is the MP of an international offshore firm giving an interview to Asian Legal Business. ROF has unfortunately crossed over the line of trying to be funny to offensive on a number of levels.

Jamie Hamilton 26 September 19 10:22

I'm sure many people won't find it funny, but how is it offensive, offshore lawyer?

Do you think "A new cultural energy has emerged and built our capacity to levels of unprecedented resilience" is not garbage?

Anonymous 26 September 19 10:45

"What a nonsense story. This is the MP of an international offshore firm giving an interview to Asian Legal Business. ROF has unfortunately crossed over the line of trying to be funny to offensive on a number of levels."

I thought this was Ian for a moment, but then realized it's probably too coherent.  

Anonymous 26 September 19 11:11

"What a nonsense story. This is the MP of an international offshore firm giving an interview to Asian Legal Business. ROF has unfortunately crossed over the line of trying to be funny to offensive on a number of levels."

                "I thought this was Ian for a moment, but then realized it's probably too coherent."

No, it was definitely Ian

Cultural reneducation 26 September 19 11:44

I don’t see what all the fuss is about. It’s a perfectly cromulent interview. 

anonymous 26 September 19 15:42

It’s interesting.  The ALB article could have featured in a newspaper column and it would just have been another example of a wannabe corporate Svengali mangling the English language with horrid corporate phrases.  Unwittingly, ROF’s “translation” has been eerily accurate (except the suggestion that Chairman Mann is simply a cog in the machine), and the crisis with earpods (while clearly made up) is the type of catastrophe that could easily befall Team Dangerous (as he insists on calling his team in HK).  I agree with the poster who expresses surprise that it took so long for this wonderful source of amusement to be discovered.  I look forward to reading follow-up ROF articles on the continuing adventures of Chairman Mann.   

Tricoteuse 27 September 19 04:24

"...a wannabe corporate Svengali mangling the English language with horrid corporate phrases..."

Perhaps he should be re-designated as the new Manngling Partner of Harneys HK.

 

Anonymous 27 September 19 09:25

There is a 2010 [redacted by ROF].  Quite why Harneys (who presumably know of this) put someone with his record in charge of their Asia practice is a total mystery.

Many of us know what has been redacted here.....

anon 27 September 19 13:18

“Now do one for the Cayman managing partner please.”

That would be even less comprehensible. He makes Ian Mann sound like a Fellow of All Souls.

 

Anon 27 September 19 14:52

We shouldn’t be surprised by this. The offshore legal world is stuffed with second rate people. It’s where solicitors and barristers end up when they’ve failed.

Tricoteuse 28 September 19 05:33

The offshore legal world is stuffed with second rate people. It’s where solicitors and barristers end up when they’ve failed.”

A third rate comment from a first rate onshore onanist. 

Anon 28 September 19 06:12

“We shouldn’t be surprised by this. The offshore legal world is stuffed with second rate people. It’s where solicitors and barristers end up when they’ve failed.”

Would be fascinated to hear what dizzy heights of the legal profession the poster of this has hit. Sounds like it comes from a place of sadness though. Poor baby. 

Anonymous 28 September 19 22:11

I wonder what Asian Legal Business thinks of all this?  Deservedly scathing satire of the original article by ROF, over 20 comments, hundreds of “likes” (and scores of “dislikes” for the sole comment in support of their interviewee). Will this Manngling Partner be invited to share his “musings” with them in the future?

Anonymous 29 September 19 04:12

The offshore legal world is stuffed with second rate people. It’s where solicitors and barristers end up when they’ve failed.

i think the Chancery bar might something to say about that comment. 

Having said that, Ian Mann is an embarrassment to the jurisdiction. Not that he has ever actually been admitted in Cayman, which does not seem to stop him holding himself out as a Cayman legal “expert”. 

Enquiring Mind 29 September 19 04:14

What I want to know is if he has disclosed the 2010 “incident” to the Hong Kong Law Society.

 

City lawyer 29 September 19 20:59

“We shouldn’t be surprised by this. The offshore legal world is stuffed with second rate people. It’s where solicitors and barristers end up when they’ve failed.”

Harsh, but fair. Who gets to 8 years’ PQE or Call and thinks to themselves, “I’m on the partner track/earning top money at a decent set and have a serious chance of Silk in the near future. I know: I’ll give that all up and go to Cayman or BVI (or worse - to Hong Kong, where I don’t even get to go to court or advise on local law) to act as a post box for onshore lawyers”. 

At the end of the day, the offshore jurisdictions are graveyards of ambition, populated mostly by misfits and non-entities.

Tricoteuse 30 September 19 07:40

"Offshore lawyer 25 September 19 18:24

What a nonsense story. This is the MP of an international offshore firm giving an interview to Asian Legal Business. ROF has unfortunately crossed over the line of trying to be funny to offensive on a number of levels."

Interesting statistic: as at 30 September 2019, the above-quoted post in support of the Manngling Partner attracted only 2 likes; and all subsequent posts against the Manngling Partner also attracted only 2 dislikes. Probably the same two persons in every case, and if so, no prizes for guessing who they are.

 

Offshore Lawyer 30 September 19 17:19

Responding to City Lawyer’s comment at 20:59. 

Unfortunately the fact that Mr Mann has risen to such heights gives your point far more weight than many on here would like to admit.  But don’t think it goes unthought. 

As an offshore lawyer, having practitioners like this in the jurisdiction makes it, frankly, depressing.  For many of us. 

Anonymous 30 September 19 17:31

How did this absolute garbage get past the editor of ALB?!

Not exactly a good advertisement for the publication. 

Anon 30 September 19 18:45

“What I want to know is if he has disclosed the 2010 “incident” to the Hong Kong Law Society.”

Or to the Chief Justice of the Eastern Caribbean or the President of the BVI Bar Association.

Offshore Lawyer 30 September 19 20:31

“I wonder what Asian Legal Business thinks of all this?  Deservedly scathing satire of the original article by ROF, over 20 comments, hundreds of “likes” (and scores of “dislikes” for the sole comment in support of their interviewee). Will this Manngling Partner be invited to share his “musings” with them in the future?”

ALB has published other Ian Mann “gems” in the past, including this:

Mann sees offshore as “the last great secret” of the international legal community. “The immense quality of the legal work, in the context of international capital flows that bring millions of people out of poverty every year in the developing world, is truly exhilarating,” says Mann.”

It’s like he just spaffs random buzzwords/phrases onto the page and hopes something makes sense.

https://www.asianlegalonline.com/features/alb-offshore-client-choice-list-2019/77732

Tricoteuse 02 October 19 06:21

'We shouldn’t be surprised by this. The offshore legal world is stuffed with second rate people. It’s where solicitors and barristers end up when they’ve failed.'

"Harsh, but fair. Who gets to 8 years’ PQE or Call and thinks to themselves, “I’m on the partner track/earning top money at a decent set and have a serious chance of Silk in the near future. I know: I’ll give that all up and go to Cayman or BVI (or worse - to Hong Kong, where I don’t even get to go to court or advise on local law) to act as a post box for onshore lawyers”. 

Those who have different work/life/lifestyle priorities and who are not so insecure as to define success by reference to your criteria (which equate prestige with success when the two are not necessarily the same thing). For these individuals, if the price of prestige is income tax at 50% and living in UK (Brexit, moi?!), it is a price not worth paying; and the lifestyle in the Caribbean and Asia is infinitely more congenial. Moreover, the so-called second rate practitioners who went offshore and set up and sold fiduciary businesses to private equity firms for millions could not care less for the illusory prestige you peddle. They have already proved themselves far more able and first rate than you are.   

Anonymous 02 October 19 10:06

another gem published by ALB, which asserts it provides "authoritative and unbiased insights":

“The Dalai Lama once famously said, “If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion,” he (Ian) adds. “It’s a different way of looking at litigation and is what I teach all my young Harneys associates. The fame and profits will come to you as a lawyer, with patience, if your starting point is pure. Genuine mindful compassion for clients’ needs also means you are more likely to win your litigation disputes in court.”

https://www.legalbusinessonline.com/features/offshore-client-choice-list-2018/75733

#compassion #clients #harneys #offshore #thoughtleadership #ianmann

City lawyer 02 October 19 21:15

“Those who have different work/life/lifestyle priorities and who are not so insecure as to define success by reference to your criteria (which equate prestige with success when the two are not necessarily the same thing). For these individuals, if the price of prestige is income tax at 50% and living in UK (Brexit, moi?!), it is a price not worth paying; and the lifestyle in the Caribbean and Asia is infinitely more congenial. Moreover, the so-called second rate practitioners who went offshore and set up and sold fiduciary businesses to private equity firms for millions could not care less for the illusory prestige you peddle. They have already proved themselves far more able and first rate than you are.”

The second-raters might have more money but they are still second rate. But I suppose something has to make up for knowing that everyone in the legal profession looks down on you. If you practise offshore you are by definition unsuccessful. As you well know.

Anonymous 03 October 19 10:31

I think “City Lawyer” is actually Chairman Mann, trying to distract everyone from most of the 2010 comments.  After all, he does have the unprecedented resilience to criticise his own jurisdiction in order to develop superlative consensus-building.   I expect the results of this debate to be startling and profound.  It’s moments like this when we all need to step back and ask - what would the Dalai Lama do?

Tricoteuse 03 October 19 10:56

“Those who have different work/life/lifestyle priorities and who are not so insecure as to define success by reference to your criteria (which equate prestige with success when the two are not necessarily the same thing). For these individuals, if the price of prestige is income tax at 50% and living in UK (Brexit, moi?!), it is a price not worth paying; and the lifestyle in the Caribbean and Asia is infinitely more congenial. Moreover, the so-called second rate practitioners who went offshore and set up and sold fiduciary businesses to private equity firms for millions could not care less for the illusory prestige you peddle. They have already proved themselves far more able and first rate than you are.”

"The second-raters might have more money but they are still second rate. But I suppose something has to make up for knowing that everyone in the legal profession looks down on you. If you practise offshore you are by definition unsuccessful. As you well know."

Hahahahaha! I provide a reasoned rebuttal, and you respond only with petulant name-calling. Who's the second-rater? 

In any event, your disdain for "more money" is misguided: if someone is on "the partner track" (your definition of success), it is rainmaking ability for the firm that largely determines 'up or out'.

Lazing under a palm tree somewhere 03 October 19 14:30

"The second-raters might have more money but they are still second rate. But I suppose something has to make up for knowing that everyone in the legal profession looks down on you. If you practise offshore you are by definition unsuccessful. As you well know."

God, you are right! I so regret taking my first class Balliol degree and earning millions with 8% tax. What an idiot I was!  I really wished I had stayed at that high street firm with you. We would have such a good time together doing RTAs and boundary disputes. 

MannFan 03 October 19 19:38

"The second-raters might have more money but they are still second rate. But I suppose something has to make up for knowing that everyone in the legal profession looks down on you. If you practise offshore you are by definition unsuccessful. As you well know."

@City Lawyer, no doubt you are loving life at your mid-tier, sub-par, 'City' firm. You appear to be exactly the type who will have that 'crisis' and come searching offshore in a few years time when you realise how poor your prospects are at your *ahem* 'City' firm. 

Anon 03 October 19 21:31

“Moreover, the so-called second rate practitioners who went offshore and set up and sold fiduciary businesses to private equity firms for millions could not care less for the illusory prestige you peddle. They have already proved themselves far more able and first rate than you are.”

They were in the right place at the right time. If they’d had any talent, they’d have been City partners or Silks. People find their level. Don’t equate money with success. A Harneys equity partner will probably make more than a Clifford Chance equity partner, but only someone stupid or dishonest would disagree that it is more prestigious to be an equity partner of Clifford Chance - or frankly a partner of any City firm.

Chancery barrister 03 October 19 21:33

“God, you are right! I so regret taking my first class Balliol degree and earning millions with 8% tax. What an idiot I was!  I really wished I had stayed at that high street firm with you. We would have such a good time together doing RTAs and boundary disputes.”

A first from Balliol and you are practising in the BVI? I would keep quiet about that, if I were you. Sorry things didn’t work out. 

Offshore lawyer 04 October 19 04:34

"The second-raters might have more money but they are still second rate. But I suppose something has to make up for knowing that everyone in the legal profession looks down on you. If you practise offshore you are by definition unsuccessful. As you well know."

Here’s my take:

1. Struggling (and incapable) of making partnership.

2. Resentful that from his/her LPC class he is the least successful. In any event, he was the awkward student who nobody liked. 

3. Lives in a suburban part of London and spends weekends arguing with his wife  

4. Kids don’t like him because he’s always in the office and grumpy 

5. Spends the morning crammed on a sweaty tube train complaining about his boring, insular and suburban life  

6. Meanwhile, remains envious of offshore lawyers but due to his/her circumstances could never be one.

 

anon 04 October 19 09:30

@Offshore lawyer 04 October 19 04:34

Much of that is probably true. But it is also true that most people offshore are there because their careers (or lives generally) have not worked out onshore. 

Realist 04 October 19 09:53

I think most honest offshore lawyers would accept that, in professional standing terms, they are at the bottom of the pile; but they have traded in prestige for sun/shorter commute/lower tax. Nothing wrong with that.

NYC lawyer on secondment 05 October 19 03:01

This really cracks me up. You think the City is where it's at. Think again Little Britain. Cayman, Bermuda, BVI, HK, Singapore and NYC is where the action is. London is great to live in but as to the quality of the lawyers.....I don't think you have a God given right to judge on whether they are better or worse than other jurisdictions. At this rate and your logic the only proper lawyers are in London. What about the US, France, Germany? Are they second rate? What about the local black Caribbean lawyers? Are they second rate? Perhaps you ought to have word with your diversity department and have some re-education?

Anon 05 October 19 10:35

The best lawyers in the world are undoubtedly in London and NYC. But you are clearly not a NYC lawyer. If you were, you would know that there is no “action” in the offshore jurisdictions: they are mere places of incorporation, where none of the actual business underlying the transactions or disputes takes place. This is why onshore lawyers are postboxes. They have no clients. Their work comes from onshore lawyers. They have an essentially back office function. They play second fiddle to the onshore teams, who control the transactions and the documents, the strategy and the legal arguments; even the onshore legal teams, through onshore counsel, present all but the most minor cases in court. But as someone said above, offshore lawyers put up with all this because they pay lower tax and live in the sun. For those with talent and ambition, however, this would of course be a compromise too far.

Anon 06 October 19 12:02

Cranks our share charge and legal opinion.  Reviews mortgage from a BVI perspective.  Writes 5 pages of limited recourse drafting wholly designed to protect the law firm and its corporate service arm

*Tells world that one is at the cutting edge of law*

big client 10 October 19 13:39

the offshore/onshore thing in this thread is bizarre. managing cross-border complex lit for two decades, I can assure that there's talent onshore and offshore (pretending London/SDNY is "onshore for a moment" in international finance). True the weightiest matters call for the BSD QCs. but firstly, they are sometimes opposed (admirably) by simply the offshore team; secondly, in multi-firm teams the only trend separating the offshore guys is they have a broader experience and world view and tend to be more pragmatic, not throwing multiple associates on to learn the trade on the client's dime. In corporate and funds, there's little difference. 

The QCs who sit in the Commercial Courts in BVI and Cayman are generally very high quality and more often than not technically superior to and more experienced than their onshore counterparts in a matter. It's a good gig for them. 

Downsides of offshore? You don't have the opportunity to get into the many little cases like in the UK; retailers, mills and factories etc. You are saddled with the big investment disputes or frauds, oligarch wars, Asian family succession wars etc. All those multi-jurisdictional legal issues and having to type long numbers is tiring. Marketing is a mission; not a simply a few pints in a slug n lettuce but having to attend endless boat trips, rum tasting, beach yoga and Test Matches means the pool chairs can feel more neglected than an onshore lawyer's family. So beach time is actually often less than once a week (violins please).Then every few years to have to live like Bear Grylls for a few months because the weather blew your home and business away. 

I miss the Tube.

Anonymous 10 October 19 14:56

There is no Commercial Court in Cayman, and no English QCs sit in the Grand Court on a part time basis. As for the BVI Commercial Court, those QCs who sit part time are well known to have no work - just like those members of the English Bar who join offshore law firms. You omitted to mention that another downside to being an offshore lawyer is that nobody takes you seriously. Which is fair enough, given that you would not be offshore if you had any real talent, and objected to being a post box for onshore lawyers and their clients.

London lawyer 10 October 19 18:48

The offshore jurisdictions are career graveyards. Most of the people there are ridiculous or third rate or both.

Big client 10 October 19 19:33

The FSD in Cayman... 

anyway... funny how some people seem so triggered by offshore. Maybe they didn’t get through the interviews or like to hide in a bigger firm. Simple fact is the BVI and Cayman Courts do very well and anyone who has genuinely dealt with them is unlikely to be making these sorts of comments. The likes of Neuberger and Sumption seem to enjoy the offshore matters too. Not known for being slouches. 

@anonymous 11 October 19 02:06

The FSD in Cayman is doing just fine. If you enjoy your work at Clueless & Bitter LLP, that’s great so no need to concern yourself with the scary big boy stuff. 

onshore 11 October 19 10:13

What has the diet of the offshore courts got to do with the issue being raised here? Or that the (underemployed) Silks who sit there from time to time as judges have fun doing so? And nobody doubts that Sumption and Neuberger enjoyed hearing appeals in the Privy Counsel from the offshore jurisdictions. Still less is it doubted that English Silks routinely appear in those courts. The point - which either you have failed to grasp because you are too stupid or which you know full well - is that none of these people would have been seen dead as members of law firms there. Decent English lawyers practise in England. It is the briefless and talentless rump who head offshore to join firms.

London litigator 11 October 19 10:25

Thank God someone is speaking the truth about offshore jurisdictions and the “lawyers” there. I work in a City firm as a litigator, and it is always a painful moment when you realise that a case has a Cayman or BVI element, as this means having to work with offshore attorneys. The first internal meeting usually involves an indication from the partner that the offshore lot have to be kept on a very tight leash, given their likely low quality, and that we and the barrister team have to ensure that the onshore lawyers take charge of all drafting, strategy, advice and advocacy. In other words, we have to make it clear that the offshore team’s role is  strictly as a post box. They cannot be trusted with anything more than that, frankly.

Anonymous 14 October 19 15:33

One important point that everyone seems to be missing in this offshore lawyer bashing. I was a litigator trained and taken on by a magic circle firm as an associate for years before joining the CPS. Then I moved offshore to the Channel Islands. Not because I couldn't cut it in London (although I do prefer a 10 minute walk to work along the seafront as opposed to a sweaty tube ride), but for one simple reason. This is home; where I was born and raised, where my family live, as I imagine is the case for many off-shore lawyers. 

Its fine for you to practice in London when all it takes is a train ride to get home. When getting home to see your family from London takes over half a day (each way) and hundreds of pounds (if you can even get a flight) then you might have a different perspective. 

Anonymous 18 October 19 18:52

The reality is you get a lot of dross lawyers onshore, you get a lot of dross lawyers offshore.  The cold truth is that there are only a handful of truly exceptional people in any market, most individuals in any sector will fall within a similar range of ability, experience and talent within that sector no matter where they are located. Anyone who considers lawyers to have "prestige" is clearly delusional or comes from a pretty poor or non-ABC1 background, lawyers are service industry providers, no more, no less.  They provide a service and usually, if they are charging between 500-1500 per hour for it, the service is provided to people who are much richer and have much more "prestige" than the server providing it.  

Anonymous 21 October 19 08:32

But offshore lawyers are by definition second rate. If they were any good, they’d be onshore.

Tricoteuse 21 October 19 09:11

Thank God someone is speaking the truth about offshore jurisdictions and the “lawyers” there. I work in a City firm as a litigator, and it is always a painful moment when you realise that a case has a Cayman or BVI element, as this means having to work with offshore attorneys. The first internal meeting usually involves an indication from the partner that the offshore lot have to be kept on a very tight leash, given their likely low quality, and that we and the barrister team have to ensure that the onshore lawyers take charge of all drafting, strategy, advice and advocacy. In other words, we have to make it clear that the offshore team’s role is  strictly as a post box. They cannot be trusted with anything more than that, frankly.

Translating a non-partner:

"I work in a City firm as a litigator":

I am a junior Associate.

"...it is always a painful moment when you realise that a case has a Cayman or BVI element, as this means having to work with offshore attorneys":

I am a junior Associate but I feel so superior for the reasons set out in this translation.

"The first internal meeting usually involves an indication from the partner...":

I am a junior Associate who just does what the partner tells me to do.

"...that the offshore lot have to be kept on a very tight leash, given their likely low quality...":

I am a junior Associate on a very tight leash who believes everything the partner tells me.

"...we and the barrister team have to ensure that...":

I am a junior Associate who just does what learned Counsel tells the partner and me to do.

"...the onshore lawyers take charge of all drafting, strategy, advice and advocacy":

We must ensure that we monopolise all the work in order to hit our billing targets. Piece of cake really: taking charge of all drafting, strategy and advice means we just re-package and forward Counsel's work; taking charge of all advocacy means we just brief Counsel.

"In other words, we have to make it clear that the offshore team's role is strictly as a post box":

In other words, get your offshore snouts out of our onshore trough.

"They cannot be trusted with anything more than that, frankly".

I am a junior Associate who cannot be trusted with anything more than that, frankly, but I feel so superior for the reasons set out in this translation.

 

HK Alum 21 October 19 20:24

If anyone knew of the incredibly sad circumstances in which Ian Mann took over as Asia MP and the leadership he showed during that impossibly difficult time would/should not be writing articles like this or leaving insulting comments. 

Anonymous 28 October 19 09:32

Meh all the offshore haters 

Most offshore lawyers don’t care about being “first rate” (like me).

I get paid more than magic circle associates, work less hours and deal with less mental cases at work. 

Just need to deal with onshore nutters sending emails at 4am - yeah like I’m going to respond...

 

 

 

 

Mike Hunt 30 October 19 19:56

The only thing that comes across consistently in these comments is what wretchedly vile people most of the commenting lawyers are.

Obsessed with money and where they are in the pecking order amongst their fellow charmless battery hens, most of them doing utterly pointless work that merely facilitates fraud and money-laundering, they spend their lives trying to fill their empty souls with material possessions and perceived status (which only they and their like give a flying f*** about). 

At least the small town practitioners - Grisham's ham and egg lawyers - so despised by these twonks provide real help to real people, a far better fate than licking the arses of oligarchs.

Redacted 31 October 19 12:30

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